The Star Beacon; Ashtabula, Ohio

World, nation, state

January 27, 2013

Kasich schools bill could bear key reformers’ marks

COLUMBUS — The education overhaul that Ohio Gov. John Kasich unveils this week is likely to bear the marks of several of America’s best-known — if not universally popular — school reformers.

Among big names whose ideas have stirred the Republican governor’s interest as he crafted the proposal are: education finance pioneer Eric Hanushek; former Washington, D.C., schools chancellor Michelle Rhee; the Center on Reinventing Public Education’s Marguerite Roza; and Google’s Sebastian Thrun, a digital education innovator.

While Kasich has remained close-mouthed on details of the legislation, he has signaled interest in some of the big ideas these individuals helped develop.

A look at their research areas may provide clues as to what Kasich’s education overhaul will look like. The bill marks the latest attempt by an Ohio governor to address an unconstitutional school funding system that the courts have said is overly reliant on property taxes.

ERIC HANUSHEK: Using student performance to measure teachers.

Hanushek, an author and research fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, is regarded as the father of education economics.

He has advanced a variety of seminal school-funding theories that Kasich’s plan is likely to embrace, including the outcome-based approach to measuring teacher effectiveness. This would be a departure from former Gov. Ted Strickland’s evidence-based model, which sought to define an adequate education and then fund its components.

Hanushek is credited with pioneering the concept of measuring teacher quality by the learning gains of students.

The idea is divisive and disliked particularly by teachers’ unions, whose members argue such an approach disregards demographic variations among students, in classrooms, at buildings and in districts.

Hanushek is a frequent expert witness in school funding lawsuits, including one in Texas this month. He says his research has proven that spending more on schools doesn’t necessarily improve student achievement.

Text Only
World, nation, state
  • 40 bodies from jet solemnly returned to Dutch soil

    Victims of the Malaysian jetliner shot down over Ukraine returned at last Wednesday to Dutch soil in 40 wooden coffins, solemnly and gently carried to 40 identical hearses, flags at half-staff flapping in the wind.

    July 23, 2014

  • U.S. pushes for truce as Gaza battle rages

    The United States announced signs of progress in cease-fire talks Wednesday, but prospects for a quick end to the fighting were dim as Palestinian families fled fierce battles in southern Gaza and the death toll rose to more than 700 Palestinians and 34 Israelis.

    July 23, 2014

  • GROUNDED U.S., other countries ban flights to and from Israel

    A Hamas rocket exploded Tuesday near Israel’s main airport, prompting a ban on all flights from the U.S. and many from Europe and Canada as aviation authorities responded to the shock of seeing a civilian jetliner shot down over Ukraine.

    July 23, 2014

  • REPORT: Retaliation by supervisors common at VA

    A pharmacy supervisor at the VA was placed on leave after complaining about errors and delays in delivering medications to patients at a hospital in Palo Alto, California. In Pennsylvania, a doctor was removed from clinical work after complaining that on-call doctors were refusing to go to a VA hospital in Wilkes-Barre.

    July 22, 2014

  • Veteran's Ducks Iraq vet cited for owning 14 therapeutic pet ducks

    An Army veteran who hurt his back during the Iraq War is worried a citation will result in him losing his 14 pet ducks, which he says are therapeutic.

    July 21, 2014 1 Photo

  • Stacked Apartment.jpg New York building shows how mod design stacks up as cool

    In a city piled high with ambitious architecture, a seven-floor structure off the beaten path boasts a distinction of its own: It’s billed as the first multistory, modular-built apartment building to open in the nation’s apartment capital.

    July 21, 2014 1 Photo

  • Scores dead in first major ground battle in Gaza

    The first major ground battle in two weeks of Israel-Hamas fighting exacted a steep price Sunday: It killed 65 Palestinians and 13 Israeli soldiers and forced thousands of terrified Palestinian civilians to flee their neighborhood, reportedly used to launch rockets at Israel and now devastated by the fighting.

    July 21, 2014

  • Traditional lottery games hold their own

    Ohio’s traditional lottery games are mostly doing well despite competition from their electronic counterparts at four racinos.

    July 20, 2014

  • HIV diagnosis rate fell by third in U.S. over decade

    The rate of HIV infections diagnosed in the United States each year fell by one-third over the past decade, a government study finds. Experts celebrated it as hopeful news that the AIDS epidemic may be slowing in the U.S.

    July 20, 2014

  • Suddenly, the sun is eerily quiet: Where did the sunspots go?

    The sun has gone quiet. Almost too quiet.

    July 20, 2014

House Ads
Parade
Magazine

Click HERE to read all your Parade favorites including Hollywood Wire, Celebrity interviews and photo galleries, Food recipes and cooking tips, Games and lots more.
AP Video