The Star Beacon; Ashtabula, Ohio

World, nation, state

May 21, 2013

Military sex abuse has long-term impact for vets

WASHINGTON — New government figures underscore the staggering long-term consequences of military sexual assaults: More than 85,000 veterans were treated last year for injuries or illness linked to the abuse, and 4,000 sought disability benefits.

The Department of Veterans Affairs’ accounting, released in response to inquiries from The Associated Press, shows a heavy financial and emotional cost that affects several generations of veterans and lasts long after a victim leaves the service. Sexual assault or repeated sexual harassment can trigger a variety of health problems, primarily post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. While women are more likely to be victims, men made up nearly 40 percent of the patients the VA treated for conditions connected to what it calls “military sexual trauma.”

It took years for Ruth Moore of Milbridge, Maine, to begin getting treatment from a VA counseling center in 2003 — 16 years after she was raped twice while she was stationed in Europe with the Navy. She continues to get counseling at least monthly for PTSD linked to the attacks and is also considered fully disabled.

“We can’t cure me, but we can work on stability in my life and work on issues as they arrive,” Moore said.

VA officials stress that any veteran who claims to have suffered military sexual trauma has access to free health care.

“It really is the case that a veteran can simply walk through the door, say they’ve had this experience, and we will get them hooked up with care. There’s no documentation required. They don’t need to have reported it at the time,” said Dr. Margret Bell, a member of the VA’s military sexual trauma team.

However, the hurdles are steeper for those who seek disability compensation — too steep for some veterans groups and lawmakers who support legislation designed to make it easier for veterans to get a monthly disability payment.

“Right now, the burden of proof is stacked against sexual trauma survivors,” said Anu Bhagwati, executive director of the Service Women’s Action Network.  “Ninety percent of 26,000 cases last year weren’t even reported. So where is that evidence supposed to come from?”

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has said reducing the incidence of sexual assaults in the military is a top priority. But it’s a decades-old problem with no easy fix, as made even more apparent when an Air Force officer who headed a sexual assault prevention office was arrested recently on sexual battery charges.

“We will not stop until we’ve seen this scourge, from what is the greatest military in the world, eliminated,” Obama said after summoning top Pentagon officials to the White House last week to talk about the problem. “Not only is it a crime, not only is it shameful and disgraceful, but it also is going to make and has made the military less effective than it can be.”

The VA says 1 in 5 women and 1 in 100 men screen positive for military sexual trauma, which the VA defines as “any sexual activity where you are involved against your will.” Some report that they were victims of rape, while others say they were groped or subjected to verbal abuse or other forms of sexual harassment.

But not all those veterans seek health care or disability benefits related to the attacks. Benefits depend on the severity of the disability.

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