The Star Beacon; Ashtabula, Ohio

World, nation, state

January 27, 2014

White House warns Obama could go around Congress

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama will work with Congress where he can and circumvent lawmakers where he must, his top advisers warned Sunday in previewing Tuesday’s State of the Union speech.

Obama faces a politically divided Congress on Tuesday and will use his annual address to demand expanded economic opportunity. Absent legislative action, the White House is telling lawmakers that the president is ready to take unilateral action to close the gap between rich and poor Americans.

“I think the way we have to think about this year is we have a divided government,” said Dan Pfeiffer, a longtime Obama adviser. “The Republican Congress is not going to rubber-stamp the president’s agenda. The president is not going to sign the Republican Congress’ agenda.”

So the White House is eyeing compromise on some priorities, Obama advisers said. But the president is also looking at executive orders that can be enacted without Congress’ approval.

“The president sees this as a year of action to work with Congress where he can and to bypass Congress where necessary,” White House press secretary Jay Carney said.

The act-or-else posture bristled Republicans.

“The president has sort of hung out on the left and tried to get what he wants through the bureaucracy as opposed to moving to the political center,” said Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the GOP Senate leader.

Added Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.: “It sounds vaguely like a threat, and I think it also has a certain amount of arrogance.”

With campaigns for November’s election on the horizon, there’s scant reason for the White House to be optimistic about Republican support for measures to revive a bipartisan immigration bill that has passed the Senate, an increased minimum wage or expanding prekindergarten programs.

Republicans looking to wrest control of the Senate and keep their majority in the House instead want to keep the focus on the struggling economy and Obama’s stewardship of it. The GOP is pinning hopes that voter frustration remains high and punishes Democrats on the ballot for Obama’s tenure.

“His economic policies are not working,” said Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas.

The White House has been signaling to Repub-licans that it would not wait for Congress to act. It also is betting Obama’s backers will rally behind his plans.

“When American jobs and livelihoods depend on getting something done, he will not wait for Congress,” Pfeiffer wrote in an email to Obama supporters Satur-day.

Following the speech, Obama will travel to Maryland, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Tennessee to promote the proposals he introduces Tuesday evening.

1
Text Only
World, nation, state
  • Cleveland gets GOP convention

    Cleveland won the unanimous backing of a Republican National Committee panel on Tuesday, all but guaranteeing the GOP’s 2016 presidential pick will accept the party’s nomination in perennially hard-fought Ohio.

    July 9, 2014

  • Obama wants billions to stop minors at border

    Tackling what he has called a humanitarian crisis, President Barack Obama on Tuesday asked Congress for $3.7 billion to cope with a tide of minors from Central America who are illegally crossing the U.S. border, straining immigration resources and causing a political firestorm in Washington.

    July 9, 2014

  • Israel strikes back

    The Israeli military launched a major offensive in the Hamas-ruled Gaza Strip on Tuesday, striking more than 100 sites and mobilizing troops for a possible ground invasion in what Israel says is an operation aimed at stopping a heavy barrage of rocket attacks from the Palestinian territory.

    July 9, 2014

  • Ukraine says rebels must lay down arms

    The Ukrainian government will restart cease-fire negotiations with pro-Russian insurgents in the country’s east only once the rebels lay down their weapons, the defense minister said Tuesday.

    July 9, 2014

  • Most children at border to be sent home

    The White House said Monday that most unaccompanied children arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border are unlikely to qualify for humanitarian relief that would prevent them from being sent back from their home countries.

    July 8, 2014

  • Family of teen slain in ’68 appeals for info

    Forty-six years after a Philadelphia teen’s disappearance and slaying, the girl’s family accepted her cremated remains Monday and asked for the public’s help in finding her killer.

    July 8, 2014

  • Israelis confess to killing Palestinian teen

    Three Israeli suspects in the killing of a Palestinian teenager who was abducted and burned to death last week confessed to the crime on Monday and were re-enacting the incident for authorities, an official said, as the country’s leaders raced to contain a public uproar over the slaying.

    July 8, 2014

  • HealthCare.gov site stumped ‘highly educated’ millennials, study shows

    Millennials who struggled to sign up for health insurance on HealthCare.gov have some simple advice for the Obama administration: Make the website more like Yelp or TurboTax.

    July 8, 2014

  • Washington state issues first licenses for pot stores

    The emails landed just after 1 a.m. Monday, bearing good news for Washington state’s first round of legal recreational pot proprietors: Your license has been approved.

    July 8, 2014

  • U.S. survivors of WWII battle recall Saipan attack

    Even after seven decades, Wilfred “Spike” Mailloux won’t talk about surviving a bloody World War II battle unless longtime friend John Sidur is by his side.

    July 7, 2014

House Ads
Parade
Magazine

Click HERE to read all your Parade favorites including Hollywood Wire, Celebrity interviews and photo galleries, Food recipes and cooking tips, Games and lots more.
AP Video