The Star Beacon; Ashtabula, Ohio

World, nation, state

June 23, 2014

Privacy advocates worry about Army blimps

BALTIMORE — The Army is planning to launch a two blimps over Maryland this fall to watch the Eastern Seaboard for incoming cruise missiles.

It’s what else they might be able to see from up there that worries privacy advocates.

The Army says the aerostats — blimps tethered to the ground in Harford and Baltimore counties — will carry technology capable of detecting, tracking and targeting cruise missiles and rockets up to 340 miles away. That means they can cover an area from North Carolina to the Canadian border.

The helium-filled aircraft, which have been deployed in Afghanistan and Iraq, are on their way to Aberdeen Proving Ground. Officials plan a three-year exercise to test the system’s effectiveness in the National Capital Region.

“People have been using balloons for military purposes since the Civil War,” said Maj. Beth Smith, a spokeswoman for U.S. Northern Command and NORAD. “There’s a couple that are flying right now. We use them all the time, and they work great.”

But the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland, which has pushed the state General Assembly for legislation to limit the deployment of drones in the state, is raising concern about the surveillance technology to be mounted on the aerostats, and whether it might be trained on private citizens.

The Electronic Privacy Information Center has sued the Army for details of the equipment and its capabilities.

“It’s designed to be a system that can surveil a large area,” said Ginger McCall, an attorney for the Washington-based center. “That would have profound implications for the way that people would choose to live their lives.”

The Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Elevated Netted Sensor System, or JLENS, comes at a time of rising concern over government eavesdropping. The past year has brought a succession of revelations about the collection of telephone and email data by the National Security Agency.

The Army says the aerostats to be tested over Aberdeen Proving Ground will be outfitted only with radar, not cameras. Smith says the system will be “looking outward,” for external threats.

“There’s no intent to spy on any Americans with this,” she said. “It’s an exercise.”

Privacy advocates note a demonstration last year by defense contractor Raytheon, which boasted in a news release that it had successfully equipped a JLENS aerostat with electro-optical infrared sensors, “enabling operators to watch (a) live feed of trucks, trains and cars from dozens of miles away.”

As part of the demonstration, Raytheon reported, operators were able to observe actors placing a mock roadside bomb the Utah desert.

It’s that kind of technology that concerns David Rocha, an attorney with the ACLU of Maryland.

“We don’t really care about radar being aimed into the Atlantic Ocean to detect cruise missiles,” Rocha said. “There’s no privacy implications in cruise missiles. But they have said that this same technology can also detect vehicles on the ground, and that they’re not ruling out mounting other surveillance technology on this platform. And that does raise huge concerns.”

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